Moving Beyond Eco-Feedback

The current debate around behavioral change and energy efficiency seems largely rooted in ‘eco-feedback’. It’s an established and rapidly expanding space, my research just scratches the surface. Looking into this subject, however, has raised some questions for me. Is eco-feedback the future, or is it a step towards a totally new way of interacting with… Read more »

Image credit: Francesca Desmarais

A Rough Research Plan

I put together a rough research plan to give Berit and Claus, at the Technical and Environmental Administration, a better understanding of my project. In particular, they are interested in knowing what kind of time commitment to expect and what to communicate to other stakeholders involved. Since I want to explore more participatory, co-design research… Read more »

Books I’m Reading

In between meeting with people and thinking about my Final Project, I’ve spent this week reading, and in some cases re-reading, a small set of books relevant to the domain of my Final Project. Photo credit: the lovely and talented Arunima Singh (who is unfaltering in her documentation of our CIID class). My goal was… Read more »

Image credit: Arunima Singh

Find Den Grønne Nøgle!

Today I ventured to the offices of the Copenhagen Technical and Environmental Administration to meet with Berit Haahr Hansen and Claus Wilhelmsen, Project Manager and Environmental Planner respectively for Green and Everyday Life. They introduced me to a project they are working on in a residential block in Sydhavnen to reduce heat consumption. The housing… Read more »

Image credit: City of Copenhagen

Alan Kay & Interaction Mentalities

I was first introduced to Alan Kay’s learning mentalities during a CIID open lecture by Bill Verplank earlier this year. It’s a lecture that has stuck with me, particularly the potential of ‘enactive’, or ‘kinetic’ learning. Whatever user interface design might be, it is solidly intertwined with learning.  — Alan Kay For one thing, Bill Verplank… Read more »

Going Solo: Final Project Day 1

With a clear workspace and a full mind, today marks the first day of my Final Project at CIID. Here are my initial thoughts about my current topic and inspirations. My workspace, Day 1 How fitting to start my Final Project at CIID the day after the largest ever climate event occurred in New York… Read more »

Image credit: Francesca Desmarais

Energy Revolution & Consciousness Evolution

Since so much of our world is a network of energy flows, I find it fascinating to think about how a systemic solution to the climate crisis entails change across our economy, life styles, transportation, agriculture and manufacturing processes, social structures, political structures…everything. In his recent keynote at the Omega Foundation, Jeremy Rifkin gave one… Read more »

Why Interaction Design

I like to visualize the world as a sphere wrapped in an interwoven series of connections — a three dimensional matrix of commerce, food, water, and energy supply chains; moved through physical transit networks of roads, rail, flight paths, and shipping lanes; entangled within the fabrics of human relationships and emotions; and all built upon… Read more »

Image credit: David Andersen

The 2030 Palette: Launched & Lessons Learned

It’s been a crazy past few months at Architecture 2030, but we finally launched the beta of the 2030 Palette! After almost three years working on this project, countless hours of brainstorming, research, coding, and iterating alpha versions, the site is live and open to the public. You can request an invite at www.2030palette.org. You… Read more »

Image credit: Architecture 2030

Forget 2°C, What Does 4°C Look Like?

I chose to start 2013 with some depressing reading, finally sitting down with the World Bank’s report, Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must be Avoided. Even though I spend most days reading climate news, my work at Architecture 2030 is largely solutions-focused and optimistic: low-carbon architecture, innovative designs, resilient systems. It’s… Read more »

Image credit: The World Bank